The Professional Auto Recyclers & Traders of Salvage Group

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When your vehicle has reached the end of its usefulness, you must get it scrapped at an authorised treatment facility (ATF). These are sometimes known as a scrapyard or breaker’s yard.

 

Many Vehicle owners are today confused as to who to approach to get rid of an unwanted vehicle.

There are various Governing Bodies involved in providing licences to Scrapyards, Recyclable Waste Carriers, Salvage Dealers, Actual Aut Recyclers and indeed Metal merchants.

Basically (The Department for Transport) (Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency) (Northern Ireland Environment Agency) (Scottish Environment Protection Agency)( Environment Agency) (All county Authorities) (The European Union Waste Policy and Legislation Section) all have some input into bringing a group of “Modern End of life Vehicle Disposal Network together. 
 
It is therefore unsurprising that the public especially still use publications such as “Yellow Pages” “The Motortrader” and “Exchange and Mart” to find someone to take away their vehicle.
 
It is not known how many publishers who carry adverts actually know of the “Licencing Rules” required of “Scrap car Collection advertisers” Years of scrutiny however lead to many opinions that publishers are either Ignorant or ignore these Rules.
 

Unfortunatly pre-emptive action such as A simple leaflet listing the rules of disposing of an old car sent with a tax disk have been made by any government agency.

 

www.gov.uk

1783 on the

There’s a different process if your vehicle is an insurance write-off.

 

Scrap your vehicle without keeping any parts

Apply to take the registration number off the vehicle if you want to keep it.

Scrap your vehicle at an ATF. This is usually free.

Give the ATF the V5C registration certificate (log book), but keep the yellow slip (V5C/3) from it.

Tell DVLA you’ve taken your vehicle to an ATF.

Scrap your vehicle and keep parts from it

You can take parts from your vehicle before you scrap it so you can use them to repair another vehicle.

 

Tell DVLA the vehicle is off the road while you’re taking parts from it. It must be kept off the road, eg in a garage, on a drive or on private land.

Apply to take the registration number off the vehicle if you want to keep it.

Scrap your vehicle at an ATF when you’ve finished taking parts from it. The ATF can charge a fee if you’ve removed essential parts, eg the engine, gearbox, bodywork or wheels.

Give the ATF the V5C registration certificate (log book), but keep the yellow slip (V5C/3) from it.

Tell DVLA you’ve taken your vehicle to an ATF.

 

2. Where you can scrap your vehicle

Find an authorised treatment facility (ATF) where your vehicle can be scrapped.

 

When the ATF has your vehicle, they can decide to:

 

completely scrap it

repair and sell it themselves

It’s illegal to scrap your vehicle anywhere else.

 

If your vehicle is completely scrapped

The ATF will give you a ‘certificate of destruction’ within 7 days if you’ve scrapped a:

 

car

light van

3-wheeled motor vehicle (but not a motor tricycle)

You won’t get a certificate for other types of vehicle.

 

The certificate is proof that you’ve handed over the vehicle for scrap. If you don’t have it, you could still be liable for:

 

traffic offence penalties

vehicle tax

Being paid for your scrapped vehicle

 

The ATF will pay you the scrap value of your vehicle.

 

It’s illegal to be paid in cash if your vehicle is scrapped in England or Wales. You have to be paid by bank transfer or cheque.

 

If the ATF repairs and sells your vehicle

You won’t get a certificate of destruction if the ATF decides to repair and sell your vehicle.

 

You can be paid for your vehicle by any method, including cash.

 

3. Insurance write-offs

When you make an insurance claim because your vehicle is damaged, your insurance company will tell you:

 

if your vehicle is being written off

how much they’ll pay you

When vehicles are written off

Your vehicle will be written off if it’s beyond repair, or would cost too much to repair.

 

The damage to your vehicle doesn’t have to be serious for it to be written off.

 

Example

A car could be written off if it has a cosmetic scrape along one side, and the cost of repairing it is more than the car’s actual value.

 

Write-off categories

 

There are 4 categories your vehicle can fall into if it’s written off. What you do next depends on which category it’s in.

 

Category              Repairing the vehicle      Using the vehicle

A             Can’t be repaired             Entire vehicle has to be crushed

B             Can’t be repaired             Body shell has to be crushed, but you can salvage other parts from it

C             Can be repaired, but it would cost more than the vehicle’s worth             You can use the vehicle again if it’s repaired to a roadworthy condition

D             Can be repaired and would cost less than the vehicle’s worth, but other costs (eg transporting your vehicle) take it over the vehicle’s value                You can use the vehicle again if it’s repaired to a roadworthy condition

What you need to do

Your insurance company will usually deal with getting the vehicle scrapped for you. You need to follow these steps.

 

Apply to take the registration number off the vehicle if you want to keep it.

Send the V5C registration certificate (log book) to your insurance company, but keep the yellow slip (V5C/3) from it.

Tell DVLA your vehicle has been written off.

Keeping the vehicle

 

If you want to keep a vehicle in category C or D, the insurance company will give you an insurance payout and then sell the vehicle back to you.

 

You need to follow these steps.

 

Send the complete V5C registration certificate to your insurance company.

Apply for a duplicate V5C using form V62. There’s no fee.

 

 

The DVLA Licensed EOL (End of Life Vehicle Recyclers Group) directories were designed to help people locate their nearest Legal point to dispose of unroadworthy or un-drivable vehicles. By using these Directories the person disposing of their old vehicle is ensured that they will not face a fine of £1000 for failing to dispose of their unwanted vehicle incorrectly. Click here to find your nearest (Authorised vehicle Site)

scrappage scheme (also Vehicle discount scheme and Car Scrappage Scheme) is a vehicle scrappage scheme that was introduced in the 2009 United Kingdom Budget to encourage UK citizens to purchase a new car or van and scrap an old one that they have owned for more than 12 months. The scheme was extended in September 2009 and again in February 2010 and it finished at the end of March 2010. In February 2010 a separate Plug-in Car Grant to provide £5,000 towards the cost of electric vehicles was announced and it began in January 2011.[1]